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Artist and practice example number 1: A recent survey of works by Canadian Artist Damian Moppett at the Rennie Collection in Vancouver

Broken Fall, 2011, Damian Moppett - Rennie Collection, 2012

Broken Fall,2011, Damian Moppett, Rennie Collection 2012

(courtesy Rennie Collection. Photo: SITE Photography)


Studio at Dawn 2009, steel, enamel, earthenware and stoneware (courtesy Rennie Collection. Photo: SITE Photography)

‘Studio at Dawn’ 2009, steel, enamel, earthenware and stoneware (courtesy Rennie Collection. Photo: SITE Photography)

Fallen Caryatid 2006, plaster (courtesy Rennie Collection. Photo: SITE Photography)

‘Fallen Caryatid’ 2006, plaster (courtesy Rennie Collection. Photo: SITE Photography)


Would you consider yourself an appropriator, or are you just continuing an ongoing conversation in art? Anne Cottingham

Everybody’s version of appropriation is different, but to me that word seems to denote an aesthetic appropriation. I wouldn’t want to claim that my level of investigation is any deeper than anyone else’s but I don’t like to use the word appropriation. It’s hard to find a word that works actually; inhabiting is an impossibility and pretentious. Something like investigation I think makes the most sense in terms of looking at not just a specific work by an artist, and not just one artist either but more a period or a time. I’m investigating periods of transition in terms of a moment in art history. - Damian Moppett  Originally Quoted Here

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